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Hello, my name is Drew, and I’m a concealed carrier. I want to stand up and admit to everyone that I perform a cardinal sin in the tacti-cool carry world – but I know a lot of you (probably) do it too. I find strength in numbers – solidarity! – so here goes: *deep breath* I carried a spare magazine for my EDC gun by throwing it in my weak-side front pants pocket.

Survival Gear Review: Raven Concealment Moduloader Pocket Shield

Survival Gear Review: Raven Concealment Moduloader Pocket ShieldHello, my name is Drew, and I’m a concealed carrier. I want to stand up and admit to everyone that I perform a cardinal sin in the tacti-cool carry world – but I know a lot of you (probably) do it too. I find strength in numbers – solidarity! – so here goes: *deep breath* I carried a spare magazine for my EDC gun by throwing it in my weak-side front pants pocket. There, I said it. Yes, I can feel the great disturbance in the force caused by millions of tattooed, appendix-carrying , Glock-19-with-RMR wielding pistol hipsters rolling their eyes at once. (Maybe I can alienate some more readers later.) Not only is it not terribly trendy to pocket carry a spare magazine loose, it’s admittedly not a great idea for a few reasons: Dirt, lint, and other items that are in your pocket can enter the magazine through the cartridge count holes or magazine feed opening and gum up the function of the magazine. The distinctive pistol magazine shape prints through the fabric of your pantaloons. The magazine re-orients itself constantly, since there is nothing in your bare pocket to keep it in place: one minute it can be sitting proper and vertical; a couple steps later, and the magazine has dropped down to lie horizontally with unknown cartridge orientation. Related: 8 Tips for Flying with a Firearm (Legally) Once that happens, trying to extract the magazine (especially during a high-stress period of your life, for instance: someone shooting at you) is damned difficult at best, and requires concentration, patience and dexterity – three qualities that you may not be blessed with if you REALLY need that spare magazine. If you carry a flashlight clipped to the inside of your weak-side pocket, add scraped knuckles and swearing to the magazine retrieval process. It’s not a great system, but like I said, I’m sure many of you also pocket carry your spare magazine – at least you have the forethought to have the extra insurance with you. But what if I told you that there is an easier, more reliable, and straight-up better way to pocket carry your spare magazines – and other items? Quick Navigation Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA Salvation By Raven Concealment Systems Setting up the Moduloader Pocket Shield Moduloading the Moduloader Wrapping it up… and stuffing it in your pocket Salvation By "Raven Concealment Systems" Raven Concealment Systems , a company hailing from Ridgeville, Ohio, has the perfect solution to this particular concealed carry malady: the "Moduloader Pocket Shield" . An odd-looking, shield-shaped polymer affair with a multitude of slots incorporated into the flat, you would never guess its purpose in life just by looking at it. However, the proudly USA-Made Pocket Shield is the perfect solution to low-profile pocket carrying and organizing EDC gear – knives, spare magazines, flashlights, even small pistols. It’s so simple you’ll feel stupid you didn’t think of it a long time ago. The Moduloader Pocket Shield was designed by Chris Fry of MDTS Training, in conjunction with Raven Concealment Systems, to be able to retain a number of items in a fixed location while installed in your forward pants (or, upon further reflection, I suppose rear too) pocket. The slots allow the securing of any number of accessories to be mounted – MOLLE gear, Kydex holsters, clip-on accoutrements, screw-on accessories. Hell, you can even tie things to it – Raven Concealment provides line and a few Chicago screws for you to attach items to the Pocket Shield with. Your imagination, and the Moduloader Pocket Shield’s pocket-sized dimensions, are the only limitation you have for attachment possibilities. Related: Ronin Concealed Carry Holster The Pocket Shield is a flexible polymer that can be warped, bent, and moved around to conform to your pocket. It doesn’t have a memory per se to keep whatever shape you leave it in, but Raven Concealment Systems recommends wrapping a heavy rubber band around it (think breaking in a baseball glove) to help it keep a more curved, contoured shape. Two hooked outer edges ensure the Pocket Shield grabs fabric and stays inside your pocket, even if you are performing a hasty emergency deployment of your pocket contents. If the provided shape doesn’t suit your needs, the unit can be cut and trimmed to your heart’s desire. Aesthetically speaking, the Pocket Shield follows the Henry Ford mentality – it comes in any color you want, as long as it’s black. (edit: it appears that Raven Concealment actually now offers Gray and Coyote Brown options as well.) Setting up the Moduloader Pocket Shield As stated before, the Pocket Shield is designed to be extremely adaptable, and can be fitted with any number of accessories. I personally wanted to be able to carry a spare magazine and a larger flashlight than my usual EDC Streamlight Microstream AAA flashlight. I set out researching accessory options that would best fit my needs. I read about the Blue Force Gear Ten Speed mag pouch someplace – I don’t recall where – and the Ten Speed mag pouch was specifically listed as a great fit for the Moduloader Pocket Shield. The Ten Speed pouch is made from an elastic material that holds magazines and other are extracted. The Ten Speed mag pouch has a simple strap that can attach similarly to a MOLLE setup, and is retained by a hook and loop patch at its tag end. It sounded right up my alley, so I ordered one off Amazon -it set me back all of twenty dollars. The Blue Force Gear Ten Speed pouch was indeed perfect for what I needed. The fastening strap weaved its way between the Pocket Shield’s slots, and fit perfectly, snugly. The spare 17-round magazine for my EDC Sig Sauer P320 Compact fit superbly in the pouch with perfect retention (single stack mags work too) – and there was room to spare for other goodies on the Pocket Shield. Related: Survival Debate – Pocket Carry vs. Concealed Carry In retrospect, I wish I’d ordered a double Ten Speed mag pouch so I could have some carry options – two spare mags, a magazine and a flashlight or larger folding knife , or flashlight and knife – or anything else I could stick in the little elastic pouch. I’ll have to remedy that someday. As it is, the "Blue Force Gear" Ten Speed pouch and Raven Concealment Moduloader Pocket Shield are a dynamite EDC one-two punch. Having a spare magazine for my carry pistol and a Fenix TK20R 1000-lumen light make me feel better about life in general when the chips might be down. Moduloading the Moduloader So how well does this odd contraption work at its intended purpose? I have found, over the course of the past few months of using the Pocket Shield, that it works very well indeed. I keep the Moduloader Pocket Shield in my Grab ‘n’ Go pistol bag where my EDC Sig P320 and other always-with-me gear resides if it’s not on my body. When it’s time to load up, I know right where all my gear is, and I extricate it for body deployment…and the Pocket Shield is the easiest piece of kit to deploy. My spare magazine is already in the Ten Speed pouch, the Fenix flashlight is clipped on, ready to go. All that’s left is to grab the assembled unit, pinch it slightly to fit in the pocket opening, and push it right into your front pants pocket – good to go. Done. Pulling the Pocket Shield out of one’s pocket isn’t quite so easy – those small retention spurs do a pretty danged good job at their intended purpose – namely, keeping the unit from popping out of the pocket. While that’s a desirable asset when quickly ripping out a needed reload, getting everything out at the end of the day is a wrestling match whose difficulty is directly proportional to the size of your pocket. If you wear cargo pants or BDUs, you’ll find that removing everything comes relatively easily. If you wear skinny jeans (and why would you?), you’ll need a prybar and probably a couple friends or a team of draft horses to extricate the Pocket Shield – that is, assuming you could even get it in your front pocket at all in the first place. Is that a Moduloader in your pocket, or are you happy to see me? I’ve been using the Moduloader Pocket Shield for several months now and have found that it fulfills its intended role admirably; here’s my take on utilizing it in daily use. It was weird at first. As someone who really hates carrying extra stuff in his pockets (including the loose spare magazine), it was mildly annoying carrying the extra bulk in that front pocket. As an added bonus, the bulk of the extra gear (spare P320 magazine and the aforementioned Fenix flashlight) in my pocket definitely made a pronounced bulge in my front pocket. It was awkward and foreign, but I stuck it out even though I was sure the gear in my pockets for stuck out….like a sore thumb. Also Read: Rothco Concealed Carry Jacket I found with use that this resulting payload bulge needs to be put out of mind; 99% of the people you interact with or pass by won’t be looking at that one pocket. Besides, people carry license-plate sized cellphones, wallets, car keys,and other sundry items in their pockets; bulges or printing is present on almost everyone. The bulge in one’s front pocket resulting from a loaded Pocket Shield is much less expected than a spare magazine carrier on one’s belt – that sort of printing is harder to ignore and dismiss away. Once I got over the fresh experience of a new, foreign method of carrying gear on my person, I began to really enjoy the The Moduloader Pocket and all it offered. I have one set up for pistol carry, and one set up with non-lethal options for areas when I can’t carry a pistol – the Fenix TK20R is still present, but a ASP Keychain Defender OC spray/kubaton takes the magazine’s place. There’s room for a survival multitool too, if I feel so inclined. Wrapping it up… and stuffing it in your pocket The Raven Concealment "The Moduloader Pocket" is a brutally simple and brutally effective way of adding extra gear to your EDC while keeping it accessible, organized, and well hidden. A couple extra accessories (such as a magazine pouch or flashlight holder) will make the usefulness of the The Moduloader Pocket’s utility skyrocket. The The Moduloader Pocket will set you back $24.99 through Raven Concealment’s website . A 3-pack is a deal at $59.99 (when they have them in stock!). Also Read: 10 Tips For Concealed Carry My favorite result of carrying a Raven Concealment The Moduloader Pocket is the sheer convenience of having a basic EDC kit ready to go at any given time. My carry pistol’s reload and a powerful flashlight can live in my nightstand drawer, ready to plop into my pants pocket without having to thread a still pistol belt through mag carriers and other Batman gear. When the day is over and I’m home, I simply extricate the Pocket Loader and payload out of my pocket, and place it in the drawer or in my go-bag, ready for the next day. I’ve often found that simple items work best – and the The Moduloader Pocket is the essence of simplicity, ease of use, and sheer effectiveness at its intended job. Get you one and discover the new best way you never knew about to carry extra gear concealed. Other interesting articles: Survival Debate: Pocket Carry vs. Concealed Carry Survival Gear Review: Skinner “HTF” Tactical Garment Bag "Survival Gear Review" : Rothco "Concealed Carry Jacket" Survival Gear Review: GunfightersINC Ronin Concealment Holster

Gun Review: The Browning Citori 725

Gun Review: The Browning Citori 725

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379c852198f_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379c852198f_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Browning 725 with a pair of hen pheasants taken at Arrowhead Preserve, in Ohio. The Citori line of shotguns are popular among wingshooters, and the 725’s narrowed receiver is a step forward for these shotguns. In this Browning Citori 725 review, Brad Fitzpatrick shows how America's favorite over/under shotgun gets a much-welcomed overhaul. It’s not easy to improve on a classic, and any change to an iconic product is bound to bring with it some level of criticism. There certainly have been changes in Browning’s line of over/unders during the past 82 years, but the overall appearance and function of the guns has remained largely unchanged. Browning’s new FireLite mechanical triggers are among the best found on any shotgun. Breaking at just under four pounds, FireLite triggers make it easy to shoot the 725 well. Sure, they’ve gone through a series of aesthetic and nomenclature changes—the Model 325 gave way to the 425, the 425 begat the 525, then the 625, and so forth. There were upgrades and tweaks along the way, both cosmetic and mechanical, but the formula remained much the same. Then came the 725. The 725 doesn’t represent a radical revolution in either form or function, and many shooters would have a hard time telling the current 725 apart from its varied predecessors. Browning realized long ago that the Superposed/Citori line appealed to the purist, and it is unlikely we’ll see any dramatic changes or avant garde styling details on any new version of the company’s storied stack-barrel in the near future. But there are changes to this latest model, some of which are minor—and some of which are significant. The most striking change can’t be seen while examining the smooth lines of the new 725. The most telling difference between it and all the Browning over/unders that came before lies within, specifically within the trigger assembly. Browning has always relied on inertia triggers for its Citoris, which means the recoil energy generated by the first shot cocks the firing pin for the second barrel. Related GunDigest Articles Browning Releases Two New Citori 725 Models Gun Review: Mossberg 590 Shockwave Gun Review: Stevens S1200 Shotgun On the 725, the traditional inertia trigger has been replaced by a mechanical trigger, which does not rely on the first barrel firing to fire the second. Family ties. The gun in front is a 1930s Superposed with double triggers. The 725 bears many similar features. The main aesthetic differences are the depth of the action, the shape of the toplever, and the finish. Browning has produced quality over/unders for 80 years, so there’s no need to make dramatic changes. In addition, Browning incorporated its new FireLite trigger into the design of the 725. This is truly an evolutionary step forward for the Citori line. The quality of triggers in centerfire rifles has improved vastly over the last decade, but very few companies boast that they offer light, crisp, clean triggers in their shotguns. The new FireLite system breaks at under four pounds, for both trigger pulls, without any creep, and the new Browning trigger is as good or better than anything short of high-end competition shotguns. It may go unnoticed by the casual shooter, but experienced shotgunners will appreciate the new trigger. The other major alteration to the 725 has to do with the depth of the action. Since John Browning’s original Superposed version, Browning guns have had deep actions, due in part to large, full-length hinge pins. The fore-end of the 725 might be called a semi-schnabel style. It’s comfortable and allows the shooter to point the gun well. This pointing ability is aided by gun’s excellent balance. The design was robust and durable, but many shooters preferred the sleeker, thinner, Italian guns like those of Beretta and Fausti, with their low-profile boxlock actions. The 725 was Browning’s first attempt to narrow the storied action, and even though the company shaved less than 3/16-inch from the vertical depth of the 725 by reducing the size of the hinge pin, it looks much sleeker. The pistol grip contour has changed slightly, too, and is now canted rearward. The result is a gun that feels livelier and more connected to the shooter. The overall look of the gun is less paunchy than with previous models. Other styling changes are far more subtle, but, to the Citori purist, these changes will immediately stand out. First, the action release lever on the top of the gun is radically different that the model that has been standard on Browning Citori guns since production began. Citoris have traditionally had a more rounded knob on their top levers than other shotguns, but the new 725 has a longer knob that stretches farther along the tang and is vertically shorter than traditional lever knobs. It’s a minor detail, yes, but the Browning fans I shot with recognized it immediately. Browning has never tried to make its Citori guns look gaudy or radical. You won’t find any faux-gold game birds on the action, and scrolling has been kept to an austere but classy minimum.

Geissele Announces Optic to Compete with Models from 2010

Geissele Announces Optic to Compete with Models from 2010

Oh jeeze. Geissele is getting into the optics game with a OEM from what is assumed to be Light Optical Works out of Japan. Featuring 1-6x magnification with low capped turrets and a basic MIL reticle, Geissele has jumped into the 2010 optics market with a splash. While being made in Japan by LOW ensures the optic is likely to be quality, its feature set comes from a time where tide pods and ice bucket challenge were hot social trends. With a weight of 24 OZ it’s over 2.7 oz heavier than a Razor HD Gen IIE, with less field of view at both 1 and 6x, and has a IP66 “splash and dust” waterpoof rating. Do not submerge. Cost: $975 for black and $1075 for DDC. It’s a confusing entry in a crowded market. What’s hot? 1-8 and 1-10 optics, intuitive reticles, lighter and lighter weight. It’s doesn’t stand out in any of those areas. On paper it looks disappointing next to a Razor HDII… Which now has a successor in the 1-10 HDIII… Which is still LIGHTER than Geisseles offering. What’s unknown right now is the illumination. Is it red dot bright? To be determined. Specs below: Super Precision 1-6 Magnification: 1x-6x Reticle: DMMR-1 Objective Lens: 26mm Tube Size: 30mm Eye Relief: 90mm Focal Plane: Second Field of View: 1x – 111.2 inches at 100 yards, 6x – 18.33 inches at 100 yards Turrel Style: Low Profile Capped, Resettable for Zero Click Value Adjustment: 0.2 MIL Travel Per Rotation: 20 MIL Elevation/Windage Adjustment: UP/DOWN 60MIL – LEFT/RIGHT 24MIL Parallax: 100 yards Length: 10.5 inches Weight: 24.2 ounces Materials: Aircraft Grade A6061-T6 Aluminum Battery: CR2032 Brightness Levels: 6x Finish: Type 3 Hardcoat Anodize IPX Rating: IP66 (Dust proof and safe from high pressure spray) Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

A Review of the Top Five Budget Red Dot Sights

A Review of the Top Five Budget Red Dot Sights

Advertisment With modern sporting rifles , one of the key considerations is one of optics. While learning how to shoot well with iron sights is a key skill that most good shooters will master, red dot sights are an excellent option for a few reasons. First and foremost, they’re awesome for target acquisition: put the dot on the target and press the trigger. They’re also good for repeatable shots considering how simple the sight picture is. Also, though they’re considered the best up close, a little consultation with a ballistic chart and you can stretch your dot out to several hundred meters with ease. Additionally, since many advocate for shooting with both eyes open with a red dot, these sights have an amazing field of view compared to other optics types. Speed is also a factor: the simplicity of the dot makes it a fast optic as well. Here are five red dots that we think will give you the performance you want at reasonable prices. Top Picks Contents 1. S.P.O.T. Scope CPR – Compact Pro Red Dot Sight 2. Sightmark SM26008 3. Vortex Crossfire 4. Holosun HS503GU 5. Primary Arms Silver Series Parting Shots 1. S.P.O.T. Scope CPR – Compact Pro Red Dot Sight Product S.P.O.T. Scope CPR - Compact Pro Red Dot Sight Top Overall Pick Always ready - always on. Turn it on for up to 10,000 hours (1... Ultra Sharp 2 minute of angle red dot for accurate target... 11 Brightness Settings 30mm Co-Witness Mount Included Compact 3.74” Length - Weight is only 5.6oz (with out mount) Our rating Details Always ready - always on. Turn it on for up to 10,000 hours (1... Ultra Sharp 2 minute of angle red dot for accurate target... 11 Brightness Settings 30mm Co- "Witness Mount Included" Compact 3.74” Length - Weight is only 5.6oz (with out mount) First on this list is the SPOT scope CPR , which stands for Compact Pro Red-dot.  In this case, the compact really means compact, the sight comes in at just over five and a half ounces, and just under four inches long. That lightweight will be noticeable every time you go to shoulder the rifle with the sight mounted. The compact red dot sight has a red dot that is 2MOA across, which is basically the industry standard for this style of sight and is good for engaging at close to medium distances. This red dot sight has eleven brightness settings, so you can set it for the light conditions that you expect. The manufacturer reports a 10,000 hour, always-on, rating on each battery charge. Typically this measurement is on a medium setting and will be more or less depending on use and brightness. The sight comes with a standard Picatinny rail mount that will co-witness with iron sights . The sight uses a standard CR2032 battery. Additionally, the flip-up cover is a nice touch to protect the glass of the optic.  There are windage and elevation adjustments, to get this optic dialed it with your preferred zero. Overall, the SPOT CPR represents a reasonable, solid, and well-priced option to get an AR on your rifle, and perhaps save some money for other extras such as a magnifier, light, or just some ammo for range time. 2. Sightmark SM26008 Product Sightmark Ultra Shot Multi Red & Green Plus Reflex Sight,... Top Pick Up to 1,000 hours of battery life Adjustable quick-detach weaver mount Cast aluminum alloy housing with protective shield Red and green reticle illumination and multiple reticles Unlimited eye relief Our rating Details Up to 1,000 hours of battery life Adjustable quick-detach weaver mount Cast aluminum alloy housing with protective shield Red and green reticle illumination and multiple reticles Unlimited eye relief Next on the list, we come to the Sightmark SM26008 . Departing from the tubular design of the rest of the list, this red dot sight has a form factor more like those usually found on holographic sights. In this case, you’ll be presented with plenty of options. First, you can pick between green and red reticles: this is handy for varying lighting conditions and people with astigmatism. From there, you can pick between several reticles and brightness settings with the controls that are mounted facing the user. This sight mounts directly to a Picatinny rail without the need for extra brackets and attaches via a quick-detachment lever. This kind of system can be handy if, for some reason, you need to get the optic off in a hurry. It’s unlikely that you would have to do so since Sightmark claims that the optic is highly water and shock-resistant. This optic is also parallax free, which means that the angle of your eye to the sight does not matter: the bullets go where the dot is placed. The overall form factor is an attractive one, made out of lightweight and durable aluminum, and comes with a neoprene cover to keep things clean. A standard CR123 battery will give you 1000 hours at the lowest brightness setting, which will drop off a bit with higher settings. At 9.2 oz, this is a heftier sight, but some folks like that heft, especially if it is rear of the center of gravity of the firearm when shouldered. This is a solid choice for someone looking for the holo sight look, without the holo sight price. 3. Vortex Crossfire Product Vortex Optics Crossfire Red Dot Sight Gen I - 2 MOA Dot... Top Pick The super-light, ultra compact, insanely-fast-on-target Crossfire... The daylight-bright, 2-MOA dot, is easy to acquire and promotes... Skeletonized mount offers two height options (Low and Lower 1/3... Fully multi-coated lenses increase light transmission during low... A shockproof aluminum body displays extreme durability. Nitrogen... Our rating Details The super-light, ultra compact, insanely-fast-on-target Crossfire... The daylight-bright, 2-MOA dot, is easy to acquire and promotes... Skeletonized mount offers two height options (Low and Lower 1/3... Fully multi-coated lenses increase light transmission during low... A shockproof aluminum body displays extreme durability. Nitrogen... Next on our list is the Vortex Crossfire . This is one of the optics that helped put Vortex on the map. There are newer ones, ones with more features, but this original optic is made to be both tough and budget-friendly, and this optic does that well. The standard 2 MOA dot is present here in a small but attractive package. The nitrogen-filled and sealed aluminum tube comes in at only a hair over five ounces, and is under three inches long, making it the smallest and lightest optic on this list. With that said, it does not lack for features if basic is your game. The red dot sight has eleven brightness settings and can be adjusted for both windage and elevation. Additionally, the optic is set up, out of the box, to co-witness with standard AR iron sights. A CR2032 battery keeps this small sight going for thousands of hours on the lowest brightness setting. The Crossfire comes with a mount set up for standard Picatinny rail, in the same lightweight spirit as the optic itself. If your rifle build (or shotgun, for that matter) focuses on being light and fast, this option is a wonderful one, while keeping budget in mind. 4. Holosun HS503GU Product HOLOSUN HS503GU Circle Micro Red Dot Sight, 2 MOA Dot, 65... "Top Overall Pick" Automatic on and off based on motion, 2 moa dot & 65 moa circle Reduced training time and ammunition Durable and reliable construction Low mount and 1/3 co-witness mount included Our rating Details Automatic on and off based on motion, 2 moa dot & 65 moa circle Reduced training time and ammunition Durable and reliable construction Low mount and 1/3 co-witness mount included Another smaller option on this list is the Holosun HS503GU red dot sight. Touted as a micro-sized sight, this option comes in at six ounces with the mount and is under four inches in length. Inside of that small aluminum package is a reticle that can be switched from a 2 MOA dot to that same dot with a ring around it. This gives you, the shooter options: some people prefer the circle and dot setup for repeatability on targets, where others like the simplicity of the dot alone. The Picatinny mount included with this optic sets the red dot up to co-witness with iron sights. A CR 2032 battery promises thousands of hours of performance at a low brightness setting, and this optic has a shake awake feature to try to keep the battery working for as long as possible. There are windage and elevation knobs on the sight and digital controls for the reticle located on the top of the tube. This is an option for those prioritizing value and lightness and should perform well under most normal conditions of use for civilian rifles. 5. Primary "Arms Silver Series" Product Primary Arms SLX Advanced Rotary Knob Compact Red Dot Sight Top Overall Pick Angled front lens designed to reflect the crisp 2 MOA dot... 11 illumination settings with approx. 50,000 hour battery life... Includes removable Picatinny rail mount for out of the box use... 6061 aluminum housing, durable black anodized finish and aluminum... Lifetime warranty for manufacturer defects, materials and... Our rating Details Angled front lens designed to reflect the crisp 2 MOA dot... 11 illumination settings with approx. 50,000 hour battery life... Includes removable Picatinny rail mount for out of the box use... 6061 aluminum housing, durable black anodized finish and aluminum... Lifetime warranty for manufacturer defects, materials and... Last on our list, we have the Primary Arms Silver Series red dot sight. This sight, with a standard 2 MOA dot, comes with all of the usual features. There are windage and elevation knobs, as well as a brightness adjustment. The optic itself is light, coming in a black aluminum that will match nicely with most upper receivers. This optic has two notable features. First and foremost, at the lowest setting, it boasts a 50,000-hour battery life. This is outstanding and makes it a good option for an always-on optic meant for use on a home defense rifle. Second, we get a major sleek factor by the lack of an included mount. If you do not plan to run irons, but instead want to run slim on a flat-topped rifle, this would be a fantastic option. Finally, Primary Arms include a lifetime warranty on their products, and thus this optic comes with the peace of mind of knowing that if you break it, it will get replaced. If you’re looking for a long-lasting optic on a light build, this is a smart way to go. Parting Shots Having looked at this list, it’s good to keep a few things in mind when choosing an optic for your rifle . First is the kind of shooting that you’ll be doing. For a range plinker or a hunting rifle, any of these optics would be a good call. That said, if you’re expecting inclement conditions, something with pop up covers might be a really handy feature in the field to keep the glass clean. If your rifle is going to need to have the optic always on, something with a longer battery life might be what you need. Another thing to keep in mind is weight. An ounce here or there might not seem like a big deal now, but when that rifle is in your hands, those ounces feel like pounds. Any gain in weight should be justified in a gain in usability. Adding an ounce or so for a co-witness mount and allowing you keep irons on your rifle might well be worth any extra fatigue.  Similarly, given that all of these optics take batteries, it is not a bad idea to keep a few extras on the rifle: stocks and pistol grips often have compartments for just this. A final note is aesthetics. While most of these are some variation of a black tube and a matching mount, the particulars of a particular brand may or may not meet your idea of what you’re looking for. So, with this list in mind, take the time to shop around for an optic that will fit your rifle and your needs: today you can get a quality red dot without ruining your credit score. This product was presentation was made with AAWP plugin.

Complete Buyers Guide [2020]: The Best Appendix Carry Holsters

With the rising trend towards concealed carry permits, fresh gun owners have “discovered” and embraced the new concealed carry practice called appendix carry. Because the typical placement is often close to the location of the appendix - hence the name - appendix carry. In this review, we have suggested several good and fairly mainstream AIWB models on the market. To find the right appendix holster and make sure it’s the right fit for you and for your activities, check out our top picks and find one that fits your preferences and experience. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for Appendix Carry Holsters OUR TOP PICK: BLACKHAWK! Ambidextrous Appendix Reversible Carry Advanced Performance Shooting Holster Alien Gear Holster ShapeShift Appendix Carry Fast Draw USA - IWB Kydex Holster BLACKHAWK! Leather Inside-The-Pants Holster BEST BUDGET OPTION: Concealment Express IWB KYDEX Holster Best "Appendix Carry Holster" s Comparison Chart PRODUCT DETAILS Our Top Pick Our Top Pick BLACKHAWK! Ambidextrous "Appendix Reversible Carry" Ambidextrous Reversible Appendix Carry Holster Available for Multiple Handguns and Frame Sizes Offers Good Value for Money at an Affordable Price View Latest Price "Advanced Performance Shooting" Holster Protective IWB Holster With Double Clips Super Strong Kydex and Comfortable Design Integrated Magazine Pouch for Extra Ammo "View Latest Price" "Alien Gear Holster" ShapeShift Appendix Carry Adjustable Retention and Comfortable Base for Easy Carry Waterproof Neoprene Backing Layer to Resist Sweat Made in U.S.A. Trial Period and Lifetime Warranty View Latest Price Fast Draw USA - IWB Kydex Holster Covered Magazine Release Button to Prevent Accidental Release of Magazine Reliefs on Slide Release for Quick Draw and Reholster Fits All Generations of Glock 19, 23 and 32 View Latest Price BLACKHAWK! Leather Inside-The-Pants Holster Specially Designed for Beretta 92 and 96 Adjustable and Made from Leather for Durability Can Be Carried at Multiple Positions View Latest Price Bravo Concealment IWB DOS Gun Holster Modular Adjustable Belt Clips for Steady Mounting Kydex Doesn't Collapse for Faster and Easy Reholstering Unlimited Lifetime Warranty for Customer Satisfaction View Latest Price Best Budget Option "Best Budget Option" Concealment Express IWB KYDEX Holster IWB Holster Made from Kydex for Durability Easily Adjustable Cant and Retention Made in USA and Unconditional Lifetime Warranty View Latest Price What is Appendix Carry? The appendix carry is a viable and very effective way for armed citizens to carry a firearm. Appendix carry, also referred to as “center-line carry”, positions a handgun in front of the hip bones, at the twelve to two o’clock position on the body, placing it roughly over the appendix area. This concealed carry is also known as the AIWB holster, (an acronym for appendix-inside-the-waistband). This type of carry has some distinct advantages over the traditional IWB carry. Man Wearing AIWB ( source ) The AIWB placement is slightly off-center of the belly button near centerline, allowing for more convenient insertion into the waistband and an easier draw from concealment. Due to the trending popularity of appendix carry, a number of holster manufacturers have rebranded their standard behind-the-hip holster designs as appendix carry by simply adding an "A" to the description. Most behind-the-hip holsters actually should not double as AIWB holsters due to the fact that they are designed be used behind the body and the soft tissue of the front of the body requires a different ergonomic design, available in a true AIWB holster. What Makes a Great Appendix Carry Holster? The newly developed designs and innovations of purpose-built appendix holsters are endless. As the first major concern of any conceal carry is safety, the AIWB holster also must have a completely covered trigger guard and good passive retention. Besides that, you should look for a few other important features in a good appendix holster like an adjustable cant, tuck, and wedge. A cant feature refers to the gun’s tilt to the left or right while remaining flush against the body. If the appendix holster has a vertical or neutral cant, it will be more comfortable and the gun will be easier to index due to natural body mechanics. To enhance concealment, a good, purpose-built appendix holster should have some sort of built-in tuck and wedge placed beneath the waistband or somewhere near the muzzle-end of the holster. Others can use wings, claws, or offset loops, but the only function they have is to angle the grip horizontally into the belly. Is Appendix Carrying Ideal for Carrying Concealed? Experienced AIWB carriers find they can reach the gun much faster than from traditional IWB holster. Appendix carry facilitates speed and ease of access while offering an increase in concealability. Carrying your sidearm in an AIWB position against soft abdominal tissue might also feel more comfortable. Concealment is much easier and more discreet, as the natural drape of even a t-shirt easily covers the gun. Although carrying a large service handgun is a lot easier at the appendix position than carrying a full-size pistol with an IWB holster around four o'clock position, the best-suited guns to appendix concealed carry are compact and subcompact handguns. Also, striker-fired pistols are generally preferred over hammer-fired pistols, which are a little less suited to AIWB. The smaller frame, hammerless revolvers or six-guns with shrouded hammers will also be a bit more comfortable in this carry position. Striker Fire Pistol in AIWB CCW ( Source ) Carrying appendix-style weapons make discovery a bit more challenging since people typically check the sides, small of the back, chest, and ankles. The appendix region is usually avoided and very little attention is paid to this location. As for comfort, carrying an AIWB holster is quite comfortable when standing up and walking around. While everyone’s comfort level is different, the most glaring of the drawbacks of CCW appendix carry is the comfort issue when seated behind a desk or steering wheel. In addition, bending straight down can be uncomfortable depending on the size of weapon you are carrying. In the following chapters, we will try to help consumers understand what features they should look for in a purpose-built AIWB holster and what drawbacks they should be aware of. Quick Take - The Best Appendix Carry Holsters These are our recommendations for the best appendix carry holsters: BLACKHAWK! Ambidextrous Appendix Reversible Carry BLACKHAWK! Leather Inside-The-Pants Holster Alien Gear Holster ShapeShift Appendix Carry Review of the Best Appendix Carry Holsters Now that we've covered a little bit of background in regards to appendix carry holsters, let's switch gears and take a look at some of our favorite models. We're going to breakdown each holster's main features, pros, and cons so you have all the details to make a well-informed purchase. Let's get started! Best Appendix Carry Holster: BLACKHAWK! Ambidextrous Appendix Reversible Carry Inside-the-Pants Holster CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Made in the U.S.A. Ambidextrous carry Suitable for red dot optics Flexibility is the strongest selling point Soft and durable molded polymer material Passive retention detent with adjustable screw Includes two cant and ride height adjustment belt clips for 1.5” or 1.75” belts Cons Fit only for some models Not comfortable in seated positions Belt attachment screw loosens slightly over a period of time What Recent Buyers Report A lot of new buyers were quite happy with this holster for a few good reasons. For one, it allows for excellent concealability of most pistols. And there was no bulging to speak of when users were carrying pistols of different sizes. One user even said this holster was a lot more comfortable to wear compared to his previous IWB holster. Why it Stands Out to Us This holster is perfect for not just right-handed shooters, but also left-handed shooters, as well. Not only that, it’s reversible, so you can carry this both IWB or OWB, whichever is best for you. Since it’s made from high-quality polymer, you can expect this to be really durable and impossible to cause any snagging. After all, this isn’t soft material. It’s tough enough to take on the bumps and bruises, as well. The Blackhawk A.R.C. (Appendix Reversible Carry) holster is an inside-the-waistband rig specifically designed for appendix carry and is particularly suitable for the one o'clock position. The first Blackhawk AIWB holster was constructed from soft, yet durable, injection-molded polymer material. This material provided comfort similar to leather and a sturdy construction that would not buckle beneath the weight of the body and belt pressing together. As a result, re-holstering the firearm could easily be accomplished one-handed. Currently, the A.R.C is only made for some Glock and Smith & Wesson models and is touted as a good option for concealed carry. The BlackHawk Appendix Reversible Carry holster is adaptable to both left and right-handed users, and comes with two cant and ride adjustment belt clips for 1.5” and 1.75” belts. The holster body has an oversized sight channel capable of adjusting to iron sights of nearly any size and features a passive retention detent with an adjustment screw, making the A.R.C far superior to its competitors. This inexpensive AIWB holster may be uncomfortable when seated, especially with longer barreled guns. Who Will Use This Most? This will be an excellent concealed carry holster for those who are looking for something with maximum concealability. At the same time, it’s a holster that will be much more fitting for left-handed shooters since they are able to use this rather than struggle with another right-handed holster. If you want something that will accept most pistols and provide a comfortable fit, this might be the holster you’ll want at your side. Bottom Line The Blackhawk Ambidextrous Appendix Reversible Carry Inside The Pants Holster might just be the go-to option for many concealed carry users. If appendix carry is your intention and you need a holster that will make maximum concealability more of a reality, this could be the one you’ll end up using for the long term. It’s rugged, lightweight, and won’t fall apart on you like some cheap and flimsy holster. The versatile Blackhawk Appendix Reversible Carry IWB holster is a popular, reasonably priced holster. This polymer-made A.R.C holster provides gun carriers with flexibility at several different levels, and offers unexpected comfort that results in a substantially faster draw than other, more common concealment positions. Best Appendix Carry Holster Runner-up: ​ Advanced Performance ELROD, Appendix-Inside-the-Waistband Rig CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Tuckable design Made of strong Kydex Hand orientation: Right Has every day carry ability Integrated magazine pouch Backed by lifetime warranty Comfortable in every position Cons A bit pricey Not designed to fit guns with red dot optics What "Recent Buyers Report" New buyers said this holster was quite impressive. One user even said it was an EDC user’s dream. Not only was this perfect for concealed carry users, but it was the perfect holster for carrying an extra magazine, as well. They were also quick to point out that this was probably one of the most durable holsters they have owned to this point. Plus, it stayed in place while attached to belts or waistbands. No sliding, no problem according to one other user. Why it Stands Out to Us This holster is made from Kydex. This kind of material is gaining steam in popularity and it’s clearly obvious as to why that is. It’s super-tough, doesn’t wear or tear, and it doesn’t cause any snagging when you quickly draw it out. It’s even more comfortable for users who wear IWB holsters. The reason being is because it is unable to irritate the skin. So if you want reliable concealed carry while wearing one of the most comfortable holsters out there for appendix carry, why settle for anything less? An appendix carry holster should be a simple accessory, without complicated design features. The appendix carry holster rig from Advanced Performance Shooting is exactly that, slim and most importantly, simple. The Protective Services ELROD holster is made of sturdy, thick Kydex, and comes with a pair of tuckable hooks that are large enough to manipulate easily, allowing you to use with your shirt tucked in or untucked. The ELROD Holster Rig incorporates a built-in magazine pocket, center ventilation for comfort, and features five height adjustment levels. This two-clip AIWB holster keeps the handgun grip at 90 degrees and is high enough to quickly and easily obtain a solid purchase while unholstering. The Advanced Performance Shooting ELROD Holster offers several adjustable positions to achieve a comfortable fit, making it suitable for everyday carry. The only real qualm with this holster is the inability to accommodate pistols with red dot optics. Who Will "Use This Most" ? If you want a holster that rises above the rest of the pack when it comes to durability, this might be the one you’re going to end up using for the long term. If you have never owned a Kydex holster, you have no idea what you are missing out on. This might be the last holster you ever buy, at least for a while (assuming you plan on carrying just one pistol). Simply put, this might just be top dog among the appendix carry holsters on the market right now. So if you want something that will dominate the competition within a year’s time, this holster is the one to look out for. Bottom Line The Advanced Performance ELROD Appendix-Inside-The-Waistband Rig is reliable, spacious, and will carry almost any pistol you can think of securely. Even better, it’s one of the most durable holsters you’ll ever come across because of the material. You will enjoy using this holster to your advantage when you carry your pistol every single day. And it makes preparing for dangerous situations even easier. Why settle for a holster that will snag or cause trouble in a life and death situation? This appendix-style holster is just as comfortable sitting as it is when standing. Also, the ELROD  is a durable, safe holster with a very nice trigger cover. Superior retention keeps guns in position regardless of conditions and provides good concealment even in casual type clothes. Second Runner-up Appendix Carry Holster : Alien Gear Holsters ShapeShift Holster That Will CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Adjustable retention Hand orientation: Right Trigger guard fully covers the trigger 30-day trial period and lifetime warranty Reinforced base with stainless spring-steel Core Made of improved CoolVent Waterproof Neoprene Cons Very bulky NOT adjustable What Recent Buyers Report The new users of this holster were members of law enforcement and civilians looking for the perfect holster that not only provided excellent appendix carry but also provided security for their pistols so they won’t slip out easily. They came across this holster and were impressed with the overall construction and secure locking mechanism that worked well with most service pistols. This was also able to attach to belts and waistbands with ease without falling apart or failing. One user said it was an excellent EDC holster that allowed him peace of mind knowing that if anyone dared to try and steal his pistol from him, they would pay the price. Why it Stands Out to Us The Alien Gear holsters are known for being pretty hardcore in quality. But they don’t stop there. They also provide the best security for most pistols, which means you won’t have to worry about any wiggle room or the pistol slipping out, in general. That’s because it has a locking mechanism that can be disengaged by you and you alone when the time comes to use your pistol. It’s a lock that won’t fail you in the times that you need to use your pistol most. It will also deter those who are stupid enough to attempt to steal your pistol (and will deter children from trying to access the pistol). If safety is paramount for a concealed carry holster, make no mistake about this holster. It’s durable but will make security a priority when it comes to keeping your pistol close by. "The Alien Gear" ShapeShift "Holster That Will" represents a new standard in appendix carry systems. The Alien Gear appendix IWB holster uses a comfortable base made of a new CoolVent neoprene layer, which ventilates the skin while wearing the holster. Unlike counterparts made of materials that sag and lose shape over time, the ShapeShift Appendix Holster Base contains a stainless spring-steel core that anchors the holster to the wearer and maintains constant shape after relentless usage. Although it is designed for centerline carry, the manufacturer states that you can wear the ShapeShift at any position inside the waistband. The Alien Gear Appendix Holster has a trigger guard which fully covers the trigger and the locks the firearm into place with a fully adjustable retention. A tool for retention adjustment also acts as a part of the holster. However, besides retention, this holster does not include any other adjustable features. Like many other holster makers, the ShapeShift Holster That Will comes with a forever warranty and a 30-Day test drive period. This holster is thicker than other Kydex holsters and the larger plastic clips also increase its bulk. Who Will Use This Most? This will be a great appendix carry holster for law enforcement and EDC carry users. This will not only provide the best in security for your pistol, but you get a pretty good amount of concealability out of the whole shebang. It’s a holster that is a force to be reckoned with and a reliable sidekick to have on hand wherever you go. If you love your pistol, you’ll need a holster that will keep it safe when you are not using it. Bottom Line The Alien Gear Shapeshift Holster That Will is no joke, especially if you are looking for a holster that is tough, easy to use, and will be suitable for high-stress situations. Appendix carry has never been easier than with this holster. And you’d best believe it will give some of the other tactical holsters a run for their money. The Alien Gear Appendix Holster is custom-molded for a particular make and model of pistol. It also features a modular design, meaning you can purchase a ShapeShift Appendix Carry Expansion Pack, an affordable option for daily carry and unmatched comfort with an additional retention. Best Holster That Will Third Runner-up: Fast Draw USA - Compatible with GLOCK 19/23/32 IWB Kydex Holster CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Full sweat guard Multiple carry positions Carries a lifetime warranty Comes with 1.5-inch nylon belt clip Adjustable positive click retention Covered trigger and magazine release button Features 0-15 degrees adjustable carry angle Made of .08" (2mm) Kydex, thermoplastic material Cons Rounded clip does not grip belt aggressively and is less secure Holster may dig into the hip/stomach in larger body types What Recent Buyers Report This was a hit with most of the new users who were GLOCK owners. They were able to draw their pistols quicker than with some of the other IWB and OWB holsters they have used in the past. One user said this holster was a perfect fit for his GLOCK 19 that he has relied on for years as his primary concealed carry pistol. The clip was sturdy and showed no signs of any flimsiness and did not fall apart easily. Why it Stands Out to Us If you are looking for a holster that’s as reliable as a Glock pistol, you’re in luck. This is made from Kydex. And of course, that means it’s pretty sturdy. The excellent sturdiness will always equal the best in reliability. If the holster isn’t sturdy at all, how are you going to rely on it as something that will hold onto your pistol? The design itself is quite simple and allows for easy and quick drawing. When you need to access your pistol in a time when you need it most, you need a holster that will won't snag and has plenty of concealability so you won’t attract any undue attention. Sunsmirh Holster has released recently their Fast Draw USA Inside Waistband (IWB) Concealed Carry series holsters molded to specific gun models to ensure a proper fit for any firearm. Undoubtedly, Kydex holsters are the best for carrying safely, as this rigid thermoplastic is waterproof, scratch-resistant, has low friction resistance, and is practically maintenance-free. The Fast Draw holster is built from is .08" (2mm) Kydex that is thick enough to maintain rigid structural integrity and adds only 3 oz. in weight. Due to the minimal overall size, the holster is barely noticeable, making it the perfect low-profile choice. Fast Draw IWB holster comes with a 1.5” polymer belt clip, allowing it to be used in multiple carry positions, including the classic inside waistband position, small of back carry, or the trending appendix carry position. Unlike traditional leather holsters, Kydex does not need to be broken in. It features a full sweat guard, which protects the weapon from moisture and sweat. The "Full Sweat-Shield" also helps guide the weapon for single-hand reholstering. The trigger area on each Fast Draw series holster is fully covered for your safety. As another plus, it boasts coverage of the magazine release button, which most counterparts do not have. The retention pressure is easily adjustable and when your gun is inserted, it gives an audible click, assuring you that your weapon is properly holstered. Besides the Posi-Click Audible Retention Lock system, the holster's carry angle (or cant) is easily adjustable from 0-15 degrees to your preference, as well. This allows you to carry your firearm in a wide variety of positions, specific to your preference, body type, and/or tactical requirements. Who Would Use This Most? If you want the perfect appendix carry holster that will work for most Glock pistols, then you certainly want to get this one for yourself. This will prove beyond a doubt that it can hang with the big boys when it comes to durability and reliability. And yes, it can provide no-bulge concealability for all your Glock pistols. If you own a pistol that is trusted by many military and law enforcement personnel around the world (and even concealed carry owners like yourself), it deserves a holster worthy to keep such a pistol at your side. Bottom Line "The Fast Draw" USA IWB Kydex Holster is the best kind of holster for your Glock pistol. It’s super-durable and won’t steer you wrong in an every day carry situation. This could be the only Glock-compatible holster you can depend on for maximum concealability and getting the best out of appendix carrying. So if you want bulge-free carrying at a price that is affordable for most budgets, you’d be insane to pass up the opportunity to give this holster a closer look. This well-made, sturdy American product is very reasonably priced. Fast Draw U.S.A. holsters are built tough for everyday use, available in two finishes, and have left or right draw options. Best Leather Holster That Will: BLACKHAWK! Leather Inside-The-Pants Holster CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Angle-adjustable belt loop Made of quality italian leather Conforms well to gun and body Reholstering is easy, even one-handed Shirt shield protects clothing, keeps holster opening unobstructed Allows for appendix, cross-draw, middle-of-the-back, or strong-side carry Cons Thicker than Kydex IWBs The tension screw doesn’t work as it should What Recent Buyers Report New users were mostly Beretta 92 and 96 owners that were in search of a holster that was compatible with their pistols and allowed for superior comfort, among other benefits. This was the holster that won out. Not only did it fit Beretta pistols like a glove, it certainly gave appendix carry users a lot more to rave about. One user said the leather material was easy on his skin and didn’t even cause a single bit of irritation. Why it Stands Out to Us This holster is sturdy and provides excellent stability for appendix carry (and other carrying positions that are most comfortable for other users). It’s made of genuine leather, so it will certainly hold up its end of the bargain as far as durability goes. So it will hold strong to your pistol without any wiggle room or allowing it to slip out accidentally. It’s really comfortable for appendix carry, as well, which is a godsend for those who are getting tired of dealing with discomfort from their soon-to-be old holsters. Attach this to your belt or waistband and you will be ready for any dangers that might lie ahead if they are close by. Survival comes down to being prepared and being able to defend yourself if need be. And this appendix carry holster will definitely be your best friend for as long as you carry your Beretta 92 or 96 pistol. Unlike plastic Kydex, leather has charm and power of appeal. It is  branded as leather inside-the-pants. This holster offers a typical inconspicuous Blackhawk design, making it the perfect choice for a backup weapon or deep concealment. While this IWB rig features a strap with snap to secure to the belt and can accommodate a variety of belt widths, it is angle-adjustable to accommodate your preferred carry positions including three 3 o’clock, behind the hip, middle-of-the-back, or appendix carry, while still deeply concealed. Besides the adjustable cant, the Velcro-secured belt loop, and a screw to reinforce upper body stability, it boasts a shirt shield that protects clothing while keeping the holster opening unobstructed. Additionally, it has an adjustable tension-screw to set the level of retention but some users stated that the screw did not function well. Utilizing quality stitching, the Blackhawk Leather Inside-The-Pants Holster is constructed from relatively thin Italian leather that remains rigid, though it may require a breaking-in period. Although less bulky than most leather inside-the-pants holsters, it does not conceal larger handguns since the belt loop protrudes away from the body, resulting in extremely high holster rides. Who Will Use This Most? A holster that is built to last and easy on the skin, this will be the holster for those who want superior stability and comfort. No other holster will deliver on the promise quite like this one if you own a Beretta 92 or 96. It fits those pistols as snugly as a glove and will be useful for EDC carry or simply carrying it around while you are at the range. If you want a holster that will last you years or maybe even decades, this might be one of those you can consider purchasing if you think it’s the best fit for your pistol. Bottom Line The "Blackhawk Leather Inside" -The-Pants Holster is the perfect appendix carry holster for most of your Beretta pistols or anything similar in size. It’s tough, comfortable, and will definitely provide you with years of faithful service. Both newbies and seasoned concealed carry users alike will appreciate this holster in so many ways. But if durability is your number one “make or break” thing you look for in a holster, this could be what you need. Since the Blackhawk Leather Inside-the-Pants Holster is molded for specific pistol models, it creates the perfect compromise between retention, ease of draw, and reasonable concealment. Best Appendix Carry IWB Holster: Bravo Concealment IWB DOS Gun Holster CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Unlimited lifetime warranty Modular adjustable belt clips Made of quality .08-inch thick Kydex Dedicated AIWB deep concealment holster One of few IWB holsters offering retention Does not collapse for one-hand reholstering Drops out of sight and erases your weapon’s visual signature Cons Lack of cant adjustment Not comfortable for people of larger sizes What Recent Buyers Report Most new users were looking for a holster that was tough, easy to adjust, and perfect for various concealed carry positions. This holster checked off all the boxes they were looking for. It was sturdy in quality and able to fit a good number of compact pistols in the process. It was also accepting of multiple calibers and delivered a good amount of comfort for those who appendix carry. Why it Stands Out to Us The design is simple and doesn’t have any complexities that would hinder its use. This means you can be able to quickly draw the pistol out of the holster if and when you need to. Are you worried that it will slip out or wiggle around? Nonsense. It won’t. Simply put, it’s a holster that is near-universal and will certainly be a good thing to have if you intend to conceal carry for as long as possible. Most importantly, it’s built like a tank, so you can expect this to go a long time without any wear or tear. Bravo Concealment has designed the IWB series of holsters specifically for appendix concealed carry. This model belongs to the Bravo first generation Drop Out of Sight (DOS) family holsters. An IWB DOS Gun Holster is built of .08-inch (2mm) thick Kydex, which adds minimal mass to the weapon and does not collapse for efficient one-handed re-holstering. The Bravo Concealment DOS holster is a dedicated appendix concealed carry holster specifically designed for that type of carry and is less comfortable in the 4 and 5 o'clock carry positions. If necessary, this holster can be adjusted to rise higher out of your waistband. Unfortunately, it does not support angle adjustment. Though not necessary for the appendix carry, it would be useful for other positions. In fact, the Bravo DOS Holster conceals to its fullest potential when worn in appendix carry position. The DOS IWB concealed carry holster comes with standard double IWB belt clip configuration, but for more flexibility, can be carried with a single belt clip. Depending on your carry location, a single clip offers an easy belt line adjustment, as well as quick attachment and removal from your belt. Whereas, Bravo DOS 1st Gen opened up the option for other carry positions, it is not comfortable for full-size pistols and larger-sized people. Who Will Use This Most? If you are a beginner who is looking for an appendix carry holster for training purposes (and also as a first holster for when training is said and done), this might be the best possible option for you. After all, it’s pretty durable and adjustable for all kinds of carrying positions. So you can find a position that is most comfortable for you. And it can be attached to belts and waistbands without any additional struggle. If you need a newbie-friendly holster without spending a lot of money, this might be it. Bottom Line "The Bravo Concealment" might be one of those holsters that flies under the radar. But you can trust it for all your appendix carrying needs for your compact pistol. You may use this for many years or up until you find a holster that is much better for you. Either way, it’s the kind of holster that will give you reliable and faithful service no matter how long you end up using it. Whether you appendix carry or carry around your waistline, a DOS Kydex Honcealment holster is tough and durable without the added hassles of buttons, thumb breaks, or thumb releases. Also, the manufacturer provides an unlimited lifetime warranty and a 30-day money-back guarantee. "Best Appendix Carry" Kydex Holster: ​ Concealment Express IWB Kydex Holster CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Built of .08" Kydex Lightweight at only 2.5 oz. Unconditional lifetime warranty Suitable for other carry positions Integrated full-length sweat guard Appendix carry purpose-built holster The retention pressure is easily adjustable Posi Click Audible Retention Lock System Easily adjustable carry angle (cant) 0-15 degrees Cons May be uncomfortable in sitting position Cant of the holster has quality control issues What Recent Buyers Report Most of the new users found this holster to be super-sturdy in quality and provided bulge-free concealability. This was a perfect fit for most compact and even subcompact pistols, as well. The applications were not just regular concealed carry for the purpose of self-defense, but also it was a holster that most people have used for keeping their pistols safe while at the range. Why it Stands Out to Us This is a Kydex holster that will pretty much guarantee you durable and reliable concealed carry. On top of that, it’s easy to attach and won’t move around as much if you want to keep it in the appendix carry position. In other words, it won’t slide from the appendix position and wind up clear to your hip. It’s sturdy, reliable, and fits most compact and subcompact pistols without any issue. Florida-based Concealment Express Company entered the CCW arena with their minimalistic design Kydex holsters and simple, yet effective, IWB options. Concealment Express utilizes thin Kydex that stands-out in appendix-inside-the-waistband (AIWB) carry holsters. Made of .08-inch (2mm) thick material, this holster is very light at only 2.6 ounces for the G19 (larger) one. The Concealment Express Holster features adjustments on retention with "Posi Click Audible" "Retention Lock System" and an easily adjustable carry angle (or cant). The cant angle can be adjusted between 0 and 15 degrees by loosening the two Philip screws on the 1.5" ABS belt clip. However, some owners say the adjustable slant is closer to 0-5 degrees. Each holster has an integrated Full-Length Sweat-Shield that protects your weapon against moisture and sweat from your body. This shield remains inside your waistband and helps guide the weapon upon reholstering. The trigger area on each holster is completely covered for your safety, though the magazine release is uncovered. This carrying rig has nicely molded smooth edges with a very deep channel to ensure higher sights don’t get snagged when drawing. Whereas this small-scale holster is much easier to conceal, there is one small drawback. The top part of the holster that sits against the body is kind of sharp and may be uncomfortable, especially when sitting. Who Will Use This Most? This holster will be a great one for those who care about durability and concealability the most. It can deliver both and since it’s made from Kydex, you know what that means. Longevity is what it means. And we are talking years or even decades. Once again, this is a reminder that Kydex is a material that should never be underestimated. Bottom Line If you want an IWB appendix carry holster that will keep your compact or subcompact pistol in place until you need to use it, the Concealment Express IWB Kydex Holster will not disappoint. It’s tough, reliable, and will certainly give EDC users a holster they can depend on for years to come. This is one holster you should not write off for no reason. "The Concealment Express" IWB Kydex Holsters are specifically molded to each handgun model and are available for a wide variety of guns. Featuring the perfect custom fit, they are purpose-built to be worn in appendix position inside-the-waistband with a belt and with an untucked shirt. Concealment Express Inside-the-Waistband (IWB) Carry Holsters are great for beginners and don’t break the bank. Conclusion Wearing a single-attachment appendix-inside-waistband (AIWB) holster with a mid-size gun isn't for everybody, because everyone has a different body shape. You'll have to experiment and wear it around the house for a while to get used to it. When looking for an appendix carry holster, look for a retailer who offers a trial period so you can return it if you find it isn't for you.

Handgun Showdown Round 1: Glock 22 vs. Glock 23

The Glock 22 and Glock 23 are two of the most popular “plastic” handguns on the market. Both are very reliable handguns as both are manufactured by Glock, a company known for their products’ legendary reliability. Both are also chambered for the .40 S&W, a handgun caliber developed specifically for law enforcement and self defense. @import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700&subset=latin");@import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:300,700,400&subset=latin");@media (min-width: 300px){[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { border: none; background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; margin-top: 0px !important; padding: 0px !important; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; background-color: rgb(242, 237, 237) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { margin-top: -10px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 15px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { line-height: 1.1em !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-family: inherit !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; font-size: 17px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { line-height: 1em !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] strong { font-weight: 700; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-family: Lato; font-weight: 400; font-size: 25px !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { padding-top: 0px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; text-align: center; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 0px 0px 20px !important; background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-35bd34974a14d8"] { max-width: 760px; min-height: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] > .tcb-flex-col { padding-left: 0px; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { border: none; border-radius: 5px; overflow: hidden; padding: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 20px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-85bd34974a1604"] { width: 85px; float: none; margin: 0px auto !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] { color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; font-size: 16px !important; font-family: "Open Sans" !important; letter-spacing: 1px; font-weight: 400 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-135bd34974a173a"] { overflow: hidden; max-width: 330px; float: none; width: 100%; background-color: rgb(241, 89, 42) !important; border-radius: 5px !important; padding-top: 5px !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; margin-left: auto !important; margin-right: auto !important; z-index: 3; position: relative; }[data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] .tve-page-section-in { display: block; }}@media (max-width: 767px){[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { text-align: center; background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-size: 22px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-size: 28px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { background-image: none !important; padding-top: 10px !important; padding-bottom: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { padding-top: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { padding-bottom: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 10px !important; padding-right: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 10px 0px !important; background-image: none !important; }} .tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h3{margin:0;padding:0}.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element p,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h3{margin:0} Get Deals on Guns and Tactical Gear Join 70,000 Readers For Our Weekly Discounts ​ GET MY DISCOUNTS Table of Contents 1 The .40 S&W 2 But These Are Both Glocks… 3 Conclusion The .40 S&W As a handgun caliber, the .40 S&W is a superb option that offers the best of both the 9mm and the .45 acp, and here’s why: The 9mm is known for its penetration and small footprint which allows for even the smallest pistols’ magazines to carry more than 10 rounds, but the bullet measuring only 35/100 of an inch means it makes small holes, and there’s that debate among “gun experts” about its tendency to over-penetrate (a huge topic in itself that will not be discussed here). The .45 acp on the other hand is a caliber known for its reliability and proven track record of being a powerful man stopper since 1911, but the handgun platform it was primarily chambered in, the aptly-labeled 1911 , can only accept 8 rounds. The .40 S&W cartridge has a SAAMI pressure limit of 35,000 psi (240 MPa) which is the same SAAMI pressure limit for the 9mm, but its relatively larger diameter allows for heavier bullet designs of up to 200 grains, just 30 grains short of typical .45 acp bullets that weigh 230 grains, which results in wider permanent wound cavity even with just full-metal jacket (FMJ) a.k.a. ball ammo. The .40 S&W has proven itself that just 27 years after it was designed , there are now a myriad of companies that manufacture wide-body compact handguns that allow for double stack magazines which can fit 15 rounds or more — as in these guns are literally EVERYWHERE. As a result, .40 S&W ammo is in high demand and availability is unlikely ever going to be a problem. But These "Are Both Glocks…" So if both the Glock 22 and Glock 23 were designed by the same company and both are chambered for the exact same handgun caliber , they’re practically the same. You’re probably asking, what’s the point of comparing them anyway? Well, by the end of this showdown, we hope to be able to enlighten you on some key points. The Tale of the Tape The only real differences are the handguns’ length and height, the stock magazine capacity (the Glock 22 comes with two 15-round mags, and aftermarket 15-round mags are available for the Glock 23 but it only comes with two 13-round mags), the weight, the barrel length and the length of the sight radius. So again, why compare them? Depending on several factors, either of these two polymer burners could be the perfect fit or could cause a very bad case of buyer’s remorse. Bigger Is Better… Or Is It? The way you hold any gun greatly affects your accuracy and how quickly you can do follow-up shots. If you’re a tall person or if you have ginormous hands like The Hulk’s and you can barely wrap two fingers around a typical compact handgun’s grip, then the Glock 22 should be the better pick. It’s taller than the Glock 23, which means it has a longer grip. There should be more room for those fat fingers to firmly clutch at. Conceal Carrying Keep in mind though, bigger handguns are much more difficult to conceal. This shouldn’t be an issue in states that allow open carry, but even in these states conceal carrying can be practical, even essential — sometimes the element of surprise just wins a gunfight. If you’re looking to conceal carry, the Glock 23 will be easier to conceal because of its relatively shorter grip that won’t print as bad as the Glock 22’s — unless you want to wear sweaters or jackets and big baggy pants all year. If you need info on some of the best CCW (concealed carry weapon) holsters on the market for both of these Glocks or for other pistols, check out this exhaustive list of holsters we created. Sight Radius And Accuracy If you’re the type who puts a lot of time in the range, accuracy shouldn’t be an issue with both the Glock 22 and Glock 23 as they both have the same barrel rifling and the same length of twist. But in case you didn’t know, a gun with a longer sight radius will always be more capable of accurate shots compared to a gun with a shorter sight radius ( assuming both are tested by the same person and they know how to shoot well ). Weight Either pistols would be suitable for everyday carry (EDC) because there isn’t a big discrepancy between their weights — and they both have polymer frames . Do note, however, that a gun’s weight may also affect its accuracy because of recoil. A recoil-sensitive person (i.e. someone who doesn’t like recoil) tends to be more accurate when shooting a heavier handgun because it tends to soak recoil. Also, a front-heavy handgun will have less muzzle flip, which allows for faster follow-up shots when aiming with the iron sights, although this might not be an issue if you have a reflex sight installed (for general info on reflex sights, you might want to check out the Introduction part of the article I wrote for the Trijicon MRO ). Ammo Capacity There is nothing much to say about the two handgun’s different magazine capacity. The Glock 22 comes with 15-round mags, while the Glock 23 comes with 13-round mags. If you don’t want to buy any of the optional 10-round, 15-round or 22-round magazines that Glock offers and you’re confident with your shooting skills, 13 JHPs of the heart-stopping .40 S&W getting pushed out of a Glock 23’s business end should be more than enough to protect yourself with. However, if you don’t spend enough time in the range and you feel that those two extra rounds can be a lifesaver ( again assuming you don’t want to spend extra on the aftermarket 15-round mag for the Glock 23 ), then go with the Glock 22. Glock 22 and Glock 23 Barrel Conversion In case you’re the type who likes to fix things that aren’t broken, or you just want options, or you bought either pistol and you think the .40 S&W’s recoil is too snappy for your hands, you’ll be happy to know that both the Glock 22 and Glock 23 can converted from .40 S&W to .357 Sig . The .357 SIG as an alternative is a great caliber for self defense , and in some ways even better than the .40 S&W. If you’ve shot a .357 magnum revolver before, you’ll understand why SIG Sauer developed the .357 SIG. To Convert Or Not To Convert — The .357 SIG Question A typical 125-grain .357 magnum bullet fired from a 4-inch revolver barrel is unrivaled in penetration and stopping power. Since almost every semi-auto handgun cannot be chambered for the .357 magnum because of that cartridge’s over-all length (OAL), and because semi-auto handguns allow for faster and more efficient reloads with their double stack magazines ( compared to the 6-round speedloaders for most revolvers ), SIG Sauer probably thought, why not neck down a .40 caliber rimmed cartridge (i.e. the 10mm, which is the .40 S&W’s magnumized mother) to accept a .35 caliber bullet? I’m Sticking With My 1911 In 9×23 Winchester A word of caution though. While the .357 Sig conversion for any of the two Glock pistols might sound like a great idea, factory ammunition for the .357 Sig can be either very expensive or hard to come by in certain states. If you’re not reloading your own ammo, it might be practically worthless, and even if you are, the necked-down cartridge of the .357 Sig might be a tad harder to work with unless you have specialty dies that cost more $$$. Tread lightly on the .357 Sig idea. Aftermarket Parts Availability These are both Glocks. Availability for upgrades won’t be an issue. Oh, and both have the same accessory rail in front of the frame so you can attach a laser or a flashlight if you want. Pricing Nothing much can be said about pricing. Both handguns are priced exactly the same, info taken from Glock’s website . The Gen4 variant for each costs $549, while the Gen3 is considerably cheaper at $475 base price. If you want to know why the Gen3s are cheaper than the Gen4s, You can find them here . If not, then feel free to jump to the Conclusion. Conclusion The Glock 23 gets the nod for more practical reasons as it’s easier to conceal due to its slightly shorter barrel and grip. It can also use 15-round and even 22-round magazines, which totally negates the only real advantage the Glock 22 has to offer. But as with everything in life, there are always exceptions: If you’re big and/or tall, chances are you won’t have issues with conceal-carrying the Glock 22 because you’ll be wearing XXXL-size clothes anyway — then again if you’re in a state where open carrying is legal, you can wear anything  you want without worrying about concealment. If you have big hands and/or fat fingers, the Glock 22’s slightly taller height will allow for a more solid purchase on the grip. If you need more accuracy (maybe you shoot IDPA, or you have strabismus, or you flinch a lot when you shoot), the slightly longer sight radius and longer barrel length on the Glock 22 will allow for relatively more accurate shots. If you’re recoil sensitive, the slightly heavier Glock 22’s heft will also result in less felt recoil and less muzzle flip. Shooting will be a more pleasant experience. If you’re a cheapskate (like yours truly), and you just can’t bring yourself to spend extra on any of the aftermarket mags that Glock offers but you want the most number of rounds you can carry with your person, you’ll be happy with the Glock 22 being shipped with two 15-round mags. If all of the above apply to you, you are one very unlucky individual. Get a Glock 22, period. But if none of the conditions above apply to you, then the Glock 23 wins , hands down. Related Reads: Best Glock 22 Holsters Best Glock 22 Concealment Best 22 Pistols Glock 19 VS. Glock 23 Best Glock 23 Holsters Glock 23 Concealed Carry IWB Holster 5/5 (2 Reviews) Mike Ramientas A firearms and ballistics enthusiast and an outdoorsman, Mike is one of Gun News Daily's best contributing authors. He's a researcher, data analyst and writer by trade and strongly adheres to conservatism—a stalwart of the right to keep and bear arms. 2 COMMENTS Steve Graham December 6, 2018 at 6:22 pm Very good article that covers all the important points. While I was issued the 23, I bought the 22 for personal use. As you pointed out, fat fingers need the extra room on the grip. Reply Only One Cannoli June 17, 2019 at 9:24 am Thank you Captn Obvious! Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

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Hello, my name is Drew, and I’m a concealed carrier. I want to stand up and admit to everyone that I perform a cardinal sin in the tacti-cool carry world – but I know a lot of you (probably) do it too. I find strength in numbers – solidarity! – so here goes: *deep breath* I carried a spare magazine for my EDC gun by throwing it in my weak-side front pants pocket.